Sitting senator’s visit highlights stark difference in views of U.S. Senate candidates from Vermont on reproductive rights

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the key issue that marks *** a clear difference of opinion between the candidates in the U.S. Senate race from Vermont, Democratic Congressman Peter Welch and Republican Gerald Malloy on reproductive rights is *** the question of the ‘State. We have the opportunity to protect women’s reproductive choices. The front and center question of Roe V’s overthrow returns in June. It was the landmark 1973 ruling that protected *** women’s right to abortion nationwide. Representative Welch believes that the federal government protects the right of the *** person to choose their reproductive health care and bodily autonomy. With *** months to go until Election Day, Vermont Democrats are bringing in one of the nation’s biggest reproductive rights advocates, Minnesota Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar, to endorse the member’s campaign. Congressman Peter for Senate time when we actually come out of this pandemic. Congressman’s opponent, Republican Gerald Malloy. On the other end of the argument, the constitution, the 10th Amendment should be overturned and my overall view was not in favor of federal intervention of any kind on the matter. The conservative says he won’t even support any Republican-backed federal push to ban abortions. Some sweeping laws would come back to the Senate, either for or against the US Senate. Either way, I wouldn’t support it. In Vermont, voters are also gearing up to decide whether to pass Section 22 making reproductive rights and bodily autonomy *** a protected right in the Vermont state constitution. Another area on which the two candidates disagree. Welch will vote yes. Malloy no

Sitting senator’s visit highlights stark difference in views of U.S. Senate candidates from Vermont on reproductive rights

One candidate supports overturning Roe v. Wade, and the other one doesn’t.

A roundtable on reproductive rights brought together Congressman Peter Welch, (D) Vermont, and Senator Amy Klobuchar, (D) Minnesota on Friday. The two have vowed to work together, if Welch is elected to the U.S. Senate in November, to work together to codify Roe v. Wade and drafting federal legislation that will protect women’s choice. “We have the opportunity in the Senate to vote to protect women’s reproductive choices,” Welch said. “What is so alarming to me is when we had Roe, everyone had the right to make a decision. It’s a tough decision but no one had the right to impose their decision on another person and we had peace even though it was a struggle for each person who had to make that call.” “I’ve never heard anyone talk about it that way,” Klobuchar replied. “It’s a really good idea because there’s always been a choice and it’s hard for people to choose and here you’re forcing it on others at a time when we’re really coming out of this pandemic and trying to bring people together.” Welch’s opponent, Gerald Malloy, (R) Vermont, couldn’t disagree more. Regarding Roe v. Wade, Malloy thinks it should be canceled. “I thought according to the Constitution, 10th Amendment, that Roe v. Wade should be overturned,” Malloy said. “My general view is to push things to the state. The states and the people, respectively, by the people for the people and it happened.” Malloy doesn’t think the federal government should have a say. He added that, if elected, he would not support Republican-friendly legislation. ‘ said Malloy.

A roundtable on reproductive rights brought together Congressman Peter Welch, (D) Vermont, and Senator Amy Klobuchar, (D) Minnesota on Friday.

The two have vowed to work together, if Welch is elected to the U.S. Senate in November, to work together to codify Roe v. Wade and drafting federal legislation that will protect women’s choice.

“We have the opportunity in the Senate to vote to protect women’s reproductive choices,” Welch said. “What is so alarming to me is when we had Roe, everyone had the right to make a decision. It’s a tough decision but no one had the right to impose their decision on another person and we had peace even though it was a struggle for each person who had to make that call.”

“I’ve never heard anyone talk about it that way,” Klobuchar replied. “It’s a really good idea because there’s always been a choice and it’s hard for people to choose and here you’re forcing it on others at a time when we’re really coming out of this pandemic and trying to bring people together.”

Welch’s opponent, Gerald Malloy, (R) Vermont, couldn’t disagree more.

Regarding Roe v. Wade, Malloy thinks it should be canceled.

“I thought according to the Constitution, 10th Amendment, that Roe v. Wade should be overturned,” Malloy said. “My general view is to push things towards the state. The states and the people, respectively, by the people for the people and it happened.”

Malloy doesn’t believe the federal government should have a say. He added that, if elected, he would not support Republican legislation.

“If some sweeping legislation were to come back to the US Senate, no matter who Schumer, McConnell or Lindsey, I wouldn’t support them,” Malloy said.

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