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GEORGE FLOYD-MINNEAPOLIS

Minneapolis renames intersection in honor of George Floyd

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The intersection where George Floyd died at the hands of Minneapolis police officers has been renamed in his honor, among a series of events to remember a man whose murder forced America to face to racial injustice. Floyd’s brother Terrence was among family members to attend a memorial street sign marking the corner of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue as ‘George Perry Floyd Square’ on the second anniversary of his death. The name change was followed by a candlelight vigil at a nearby ceremony. A man who visited the intersection earlier on Wednesday, Colten Muth, 32, said he wanted to pay tribute to Floyd “because his sacrifice had a huge impact on the world.”

ELECTION 2022-MONTANA-HOUSE

Trump ally Zinke claims he’s too ‘liberal’ for Montana

BUTTE, Mont. (AP) — When Republican Ryan Zinke first ran for Congress, the former Navy SEAL faced trumped-up accusations that his military career had ended in disgrace. After winning and later serving as Trump’s Interior Secretary, Zinke seeks to return to Congress and faces an almost identical smear campaign – this time from the right wing of his own party. The political dynamics in the race for a new Montana US House district reflect the right shift the GOP has taken since Trump stormed the state’s election scene with repeat visits in the 2018 election.

BIDEN-POLICE

Biden signs police order on anniversary of Floyd’s death

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has signed an executive order to improve the accountability of police departments. It is a significant but limited action on the second anniversary of George Floyd’s death that reflects the challenges of addressing racism, excessive use of force and public safety with a deadlocked Congress. . Much of the order issued Wednesday is focused on federal law enforcement agencies — for example, requiring them to review and revise use-of-force policies. It will also create a database to help track officer misconduct. The administration cannot require local police departments to participate in the database, which aims to prevent problem officers from changing jobs. The order also restricts the flow of surplus military equipment to local police.

AMERICA MANIFESTO-POLICE-EXPLOSIVE

Chicago-area man gets one year in prison for throwing explosive

CHICAGO (AP) — A suburban Chicago man who admitted throwing an explosive at police during a violent protest in June 2020 has been sentenced to one year in federal prison. Christian Rea, 21, of Aurora, pleaded guilty last year to obstructing law enforcement when he threw a lit incendiary device at a row of uniformed police officers, injuring several of them . The Chicago Tribune reports that U.S. District Judge Thomas Durkin also ordered Rea to pay $13,585 in restitution to the city of Naperville on Wednesday. Officers injured by the device said they suffered from repeated headaches, ringing in their ears and loss of vision, prosecutors said.

RACIAL INJUSTICE – MENTAL TOLL

Two years after Floyd’s murder, racial trauma permeates the United States

Wednesday marked the two-year anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, which sparked a global protest and calls for racial reckoning to address structural racism that has created long-standing inequalities affecting generations of black people. Americans. But Floyd’s murder, along with a series of murders of other black Americans, has also taken a heavy toll on the emotional and mental health of black communities that have been burdened and traumatized by centuries of oppressive systems and racist practices. . Mental health advocates and experts say the racism that caused much of the trauma is ingrained in the fabric of the nation and can be directly linked to the mental duress experienced today.

GAS UTILITIES – TAXPAYERS – STORM DAMAGES

Judges: Utilities allowed to pass on additional storm costs

Two administrative law judges have said Minnesota natural gas utilities should be allowed to pass an additional $660 million in storm damage costs to their customers. The State Department of Commerce and the Attorney General’s Office allege that the utilities made critical errors in their gas supply procedures during the February 2021 storm and that due to mismanagement, customers should not pay the extra costs. The judges rejected the state agencies‘ claims. The judges’ decisions are not binding, but they can influence the State Public Utilities Commission, which has the final say. The commission is expected to rule on the matter this summer.

ELECTION 2022-MINNESOTA-HOUSE

Finstad and Ettinger head to special election for Hagedorn seat

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Former Republican U.S. Department of Agriculture official Brad Finstad will face former Democratic Hormel Foods chief executive Jeff Ettinger in a special election in August to complete the term of the late US GOP Representative Jim Hagedorn. State Rep. Jeremy Munson conceded defeat Wednesday morning in the special GOP primary with Finstad ahead by a few hundred votes. The winners expect an increase in their chances of winning a full term in November. The August 9 special general election coincides with the Minnesota state primary on the same day. The winner of the special general election will serve the remainder of Hagedorn’s term until January.

MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE

Minnesota lawmakers get a few hits, lots of misses in session

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — There were some successes but plenty of misfires as Minnesota’s divided legislature blew a deadline to pass a package of tax cuts and new spending using the massive budget surplus of the state. Democratic Governor Tim Walz met with Republican Senate Majority Leader Jeremy Miller and Democratic House Speaker Melissa Hortman on Monday afternoon. But the governor later acknowledged that they were still looking for common ground, and he has no immediate plans to call a special session. Walz says leaders have indicated their members need time to decompress. He says it might do lawmakers some good to go home and hear from their constituents.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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